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January 1997 Newsletter

Volume 7, No. 2


Highlights of This Issue

IQ Live/Web FREE Software - Connect Your Informix Database to the Web

Informix Installation and OnLine Configuration Procedures (Part III) - by Mike Tinius

Informix OnLine Outperforms Microsoft on NT Operating System - Press Release


WAIUG Training Day - 26th March 1997

A one day technical training event for WAIUG members at the University of Maryland during the March spring break. Four half-day sessions are currently scheduled. The cost is $5 for members and this includes a pizza lunch. Advanced registration is required.

Date and Time: March 26, 1997, 9:00am to 4:00pm
Location: University of Maryland, College Park Campus
A.V. Williams Engineering Bld.

Training Sessions

Enterprise Data Security by Summit Data Group

How do I assess risk? How much data security is enough? This seminar will present a summary review of a proven method to accurately assess data security risks and an approach to define and evaluate security safeguards. Most importantly, the methodology focuses on the need to map security vulnerabilities to key/critical business processes in order to identify acceptable levels of assurance and to prioritize the implementation of security safeguards. The seminar will highlight common risk areas with respect to confidentiality and privacy, system and data integrity, and system and data availability.

Migrating to INFORMIX-OnLine 7.X From SE or 5.X by Mike Tinius

This session will discuss upgrading to Informix OnLine 7.X on Unix or Windows NT. Planning your installation, converting data, performance tuning and database administration will be covered.

Web Pages From Your Informix Database by Lester Knutsen

A practical seminar on "How to produce Web pages" from your database. We will examine several options from simple Unix shell scripts and Informix ACE reports that generate web pages to the free 4GL and ESQL/C CGI kits from Informix. This session is an introduction to CGI programming.

Query Optimization by Kevin Fennimore

This discussion will cover the following topics: indexing strategies, steps used in optimizing queries, output from the Set Explain command, and query optimization techniques and examples. There will also be time to discuss queries provided by the group. If you have a specific query you would like to discuss please e-mail it to me in advance at kfenn@worldnet.att.net. Please include relevant information (schema, counts, indexes, etc.), your name, and telephone in case I have any questions.

Newsletter Sponsorship

The user group has been supported by many companies over the years. If your company would like to sponsor the newsletter, please call for more information. We would like to thank the following companies for sponsoring this issue:

Advanced DataTools Corporation

Computer Data Systems, Inc.

Compuware Corporation

Interealty Corporation

Pure Software, Inc.

Summit Data Group

IQ/LiveWeb FREE Software

Connect Your Informix Database to the Web

We are very pleased to bring this special offer to members of the Washington Area Informix Users Group. If you complete and return the WAIUG membership survey by January 25th, 1997, you will get a full production version of IQ/LiveWeb, FREE! A $5,000 value. IQ/LiveWeb combines an award-winning Windows reporting tool and comprehensive UNIX and Windows NT server capabilities to let you build and schedule reports and automatically publish Informix database information to your intranet.

IQ/LiveWeb takes advantage of existing Intranet infrastructure and standard Internet browsers to provide a complete solution for Informix database reporting on an intranet. IQ/LiveWeb combines IQ/Objects, an award winning object-based reporting tool, and IQ/SmartServer for comprehensive server publishing capabilities for UNIX and Windows NT.

IQ/Objects and IQ/SmartServer, generally recognized as the leading technology for sophisticated client/server reporting, are real world tested, mission critical tools. Today, these tools are in use in

thousands of companies worldwide and serve as the technological foundation for IQ/LiveWeb. Extending these tools with Internet features provides unique capabilities that set IQ/LiveWeb apart:

  • Powerful, object-oriented technology enables reuse of previously developed reports and report components which makes it easy to build reports from the simplest to the most sophisticated, all without any programming or scripting.
  • Support for a wide variety of report types including multi-dimensional crosstabs, tables, charts and bitmaps.
  • Server-based processing and robust scheduling and administrative facilities support automatic report publishing to an intranet.
  • Users can request on-demand execution of reports, taking advantage of high performance, server-based processing to initiate a database query and generate a report containing up-to-the-minute information "on-the-fly."
  • IQ/LiveWeb supports server-based processing and report publishing for both UNIX and Windows NT environments.
For more information call 800-458-0386 or visit IQ Software's web site at www.iqsc.com.

INFORMIX INSTALLATION and

ONLINE CONFIGURATION PROCEDURES (Part III)

by Mike Tinius

Editors Note: This is the final installment of an article started in the July issue. Chapters 1, Informix Installation Procedures, and 2, OnLine Configuration Procedures were published in July, and Chapter 3, Distributed Databases, and 4, Starting and Stopping Online were published in our last issue. Please refer to our web site www.access.digex.net/~waiug for these articules. This installment contains configuration information for specific platforms.

5. SUN Solaris 2.x Systems

UNIX CONFIGURATION: FORMAT UTILITY

System Configuration:

The following information is general Solaris 2.x information which may be useful when setting up your system with informix.

Use the sysdef utility from the command line to display system configuration information.

You can also use /usr/kvm/prtdiag to print memory usage.

Run "df -a" or "df -k" to get file system disk utilization information.

Run "dmesg" to view the amount of memory and everything that was done during system startup.

Look at /etc/vfstab to see what will mount automatically on system startup.

Templates for .profile, .login and .cshrc can be found in /etc/skel and are called local.profile, local.cshrc, and local.login.

/etc/profile is executed as a general profile for any user logging into the system. Use this file to establish generic environment settings and login messages for users.

Use the command shutdown -i6 -g0 -y to shutdown and restart the computer gracefully. The shutdown command will run the shutdown scripts in the /etc/rc2.d directory.

Run mt -f /dev/rmt/? status to determine if the tape device is accessible. If no tape is in the device, you will see the message :no tape mounted.

Adding Groups:

vi /etc/group
Add the new group (i.e. informix) with a new group id. Usually the next available group id in the list.
Save and exit the file

Adding Users:

Run /usr/openwin/bin/openwin to start the graphical tool
Go to a "command tool" window
Run "admintool &"
Choose User Maintenance from the Menu options
Select Add a new user
	Login Name:		The users login name

	Group ID:		From /etc/group

	Shell Type:		Bourne, Korn, or C-Shell

	Home Directory:		/home/"login-name"

	Shell:			/etc/skel

	Permissions:		Your choice or take default.

Show Shared Memory Segments:

Use ipcs to show any existing shared memory segments.

Solaris 2.4 (Modify Kernel):

To modify the kernel, edit /etc/system and then boot -r or reboot -- -r. Use the $INFORMIXDIR/release/ONLINE_7.DOC as a reference point for kernel parameters. Note any patches that must be installed as well. To see what patches are installed in Solaris 2.4 run the following command and compare with Informix release notes:

showrev -p

Solaris 2.x Startup and Shutdown scripts:

By executing the command shutdown -i6 -g0 -y the system will go through a graceful shutdown and restart. Solaris will run scripts found in /etc/rc2.d. You will find a series of scripts beginning with a "K" and an "S". The scripts beginning with a "K" are used by Solaris during the shutdown procedure. The scripts beginning with "S" are used during the startup procedure.

For an Informix-OnLine startup script, create a file in /etc/rc2.d such as S98informix where S98 does not already exist. You want to choose an "S" number that comes after the Solaris startup files. See section 4 Starting and Stopping OnLine for examples of scripts which you may place in the S98informix file.

For an Informix-OnLine shutdown script, create a file in /etc/rc2.d such as K01informix where K01 does not already exist. You want to choose a "K" number that will be executed first before the Solaris shutdown scripts so that Informix is brought off-line before Solaris turns its services off. See section 4 Starting and Stopping OnLine for examples of shutdown scripts which you may place in the K01informix file.

Kernel Asynchronous I/O (KAIO):

Solaris 2.4 supports Kernel AIO. For OnLine Version 7.10 and 7.11 KAIO must be turned off in order to bring the engine up. Before running oninit to bring the engine up remember to export KAIOOFF=1 if Bourne or Korn shell and setenv KAIOOFF 1 if you are using c-shell.

Running OPENWIN graphical interface:

PATH=/usr/openwin/bin; export PATH
OW_WINDOW_MANAGER=mwm; export OW_WINDOW_MANAGER
Type openwin at the command line.

To modify the openwin menu options for a user, copy /usr/openwin/lib/.openwin-menu to the users directory. Modify the file in the users directory. If you want to make a system-wide change to the openwin menu, then you will need to modify the .openwin-menu file in the /usr/openwin/lib directory.

Motif should be a part of openwin. If there are any problems running Informix Motif products such as OnPerf, DB/Cockpit or NewEra you may try running xhost +. You must run xhost + from the command line of the person who originally logged in. If you log in as root and then su informix then exit back to root, type xhost + and then su informix. The xhost will apply to any user you log in as from the original shell.

Determine available SCSI address for devices:

Unfortunately, there is no real good way to determine what SCSI addresses are in use and which ones are available. You have to use a combination of utilities and detective work. First, start from the premise that you have 7 SCSI addresses altogether. A typical configuration may use the following addresses:

SCSI 0: [OPEN]
SCSI 1: [OPEN]
SCSI 2: [OPEN]
SCSI 3: Internal Disk Device (c0t3d0) where t3 is target 3 or SCSI 3.
SCSI 4: Tape Device
SCSI 5: Alternate Tape Device or [OPEN if no alternate tape device]
SCSI 6: CD-ROM (c0t6d0) or [OPEN if no CD-ROM device]
SCSI 7: SCSI Board

The second thing to do is use process of elimination to identify SCSI addresses in use. Run df -k or look in /etc/vfstab to determine where file systems have been created. Look for /dev/dsk/c?t?d? entries. The t? is the target number and is the SCSI address. Next run format which will list all of the devices which the system knows about. Again, look for t? the target number to identify the SCSI address in use. Keep in mind that this methodology will not apply if you are using a Storage Array.

Now that you have identified all of the devices in use, you can determine which SCSI addresses are available for adding additional disk, tape or CD-ROM devices.

Installing and configuring devices in Solaris:

Disks

Select a SCSI address for the disk device. Use the section above for help on determining the SCSI addresses.
Plug in the SCSI cable to the bottom SCSI port on the device.
Place a SCSI terminator on the top SCSI port or place a SCSI cable on the top port to daisy chain to the next device.
Turn the device on.

  • As the root login execute the command "touch /reconfigure".
  • You should not have to modify the /etc/format.dat file.
  • Run "shutdown -i6 -g0 -y".
  • Go into "format" to verify the new disk has been recognized.

Tapes

Select a SCSI address for the tape device. Use the section above for help on determining the SCSI addresses.

Plug in the SCSI cable to the bottom SCSI port on the device.

Place a SCSI terminator on the top SCSI port or place a SCSI cable on the top port to daisy chain to the next device.

Turn the device on.

See /etc/path_to_install file for a mapping of SCSI to /dev/rmt/?. It may be necessary to rm /dev/rmt/* before doing a "touch /reconfigure" in order to correctly configure the devices. Solaris will rebuild /dev/rmt with the appropriate devices. If you have tape devices at SCSI 4 and 5, Solaris will assign /dev/rmt/0 to SCSI 4 and /dev/rmt/1 to SCSI 5.

As the root login execute the command "touch /reconfigure".

Run "shutdown -i6 -g0 -y".

Remote Tape Device Access:

For this example assume that Machine A has the tape devices attached to it and Machine B is a host with no tape device connected. Machine A will be known as the remote host and Machine B will be known as the local host since you will be logged into Machine A in this example.

I) Copy to local host from remote tape drive.

Log into Machine A (has tape drives connected)

(rlogin) Remote Log into Machine B (local host)

Place the tape into Machine A (remote host with tape drives)

rsh -n MachineA dd if=/dev/rmt/0 bs=20b | tar xvfBb - 20 <filename> <filename> is optional. If it is left out, then all files are copied from the tape to the current directory. bs=block size. You must have the same block size for bs= and in the tar section.

II) Put files from local host to remote tape drive.

Log into Machine A (has tape drives connected)

(rlogin) Remote Log into Machine B (local host)

Place the tape into Machine A (remote host with tape drives)

tar cvfb - 20 <filename> | rsh -n MachineA dd of=/dev/rmt/0 obs=20b <filename> is optional. If it is left out, then all files are copied from the tape to the current directory. obs=block size. You must have the same block size for obs= and in the tar section.

III) Listing files on a remote tape drive.

Log into Machine A (has tape drives connected)

(rlogin) Remote Log into Machine B (local host)

Place the tape into Machine A (remote host with tape drives)

rsh -n MachineA dd if=/dev/rmt/0 bs=20b | tar tvfBb - 20

bs=block size. You must have the same block size for bs= and in the tar section.

CD-ROM

The CD-ROM drive is typically installed with a SCSI id of 6. Find the mechanism on the CD-ROM drive to change the SCSI id and change to the appropriate SCSI address. Use the

section above for help on determining the SCSI addresses.

Plug in the SCSI cable to the bottom SCSI port on the device.

Place a SCSI terminator on the top SCSI port or place a SCSI cable on the top port to daisy chain to the next device.

Turn the device on.

  • As the root login execute the command "touch /reconfigure".
  • Run "shutdown -i6 -g0 -y".

After the system comes up, you should be able to access the CD-ROM by doing a cd /cdrom/cdrom0 and an ls -al to view the contents. To share the CD-ROM permanently so that other machines on the network can access it, you would put an entry in /etc/dfs/dfstab. An example follows:

/dev/dsk/c0t6d0 nfs -o ro -d "Comment" /cdrom/cdrom0

or run the following from the command line:

share -F nfs -o ro -d "Comment" /cdrom/cdrom0

From a different machine you would run the following command to mount the CD-ROM.

mount -F nfs remote-hostname:/cdrom/"cdrom-label" /cdrom

remote-hostname refers to the host where the CD-ROM device is attached and "cdrom-label" refers to the specific label for each CD-ROM disk. This will change when a new CD-ROM is placed in the device. The other option is to make it more permanent by placing an entry into the /etc/vfstab file as shown below:

remote-hostname:/cdrom/cdrom0 - cdrom nfs - yes -

A .rhosts file should exist in the root directory of each machine which will access the CD-ROM. The .rhosts file will contain the name hostname of the machine with the CD-ROM device. The machine with the CD-ROM device must have a .rhosts file in its root directory with the hostname of the machines which will be accessing the CD-ROM.

Changing a CD-ROM:

The following is an example of changing a CD-ROM and accessing from a remote machine. Machine A has the CD-ROM drive attached to it. Machine B will access it remotely.

Machine B

umount /cdrom

Machine A

eject cdrom
<put a new CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive>
dfshares - run this to see what the label is which you want to share

Machine B

mount -F nfs machineA:/cdrom/"cdrom-label" /cdrom

Configuring Disks and Setting Informix Permissions:

Partitioning a disk using the format utility:

Run "format".

Type "partition"

Type "print" to get a current map or layout of the partitions. Sun can break a disk up into 7 slices. Slice 2 always indicates the entire disk. On a 2 Gig disk there is approximately 1306 cylinders.

Determine how you want to configure the slices.

1. Enter the partition # to configure: (i.e. 0)

2. Enter the partition id: <return for default>

3. Enter the permission: <return for default-wm>

4. Enter starting cylinder: (i.e. 0)

Enter size of partition: (b=blocks, c=cylinders, mb=megabytes). Choose the measurement type you wish to express the partition size.

Type "print" to show the changes and verify the results.

5. Repeat steps 5-10 for each partition. Proceed to step #12 when finished.

6. Type "label" after you have completed partitioning the disk.

7. Answer "yes" to the prompt.

8. Type "print" to show final results.

9. Type "quit" to exit partition.

10. Type "quit" to exit format.

Creating file systems for large data files:

Determine which device should be used for the new file system.

newfs /dev/rdsk/c?t?d?s?

mkdir "mount point directory"

1. mount /data

To make mount point permanent: vi /etc/vfstab, copy one of the nfs entries, Modify it to reflect the new device and mount point directory. The next time the machine is rebooted, this new file system will be there.

Configuring raw device through the format utility:

Run "format" to find out how partitions (slices) are created. Sun can break a disk up into 7 slices. The raw slice 2 ALWAYS indicates the entire disk. If you configure an OnLine database using slice 0 or slice 2, you must use an offset of at least 50KB. If you do not use an offset, OnLine will write over the disk VTOC. This will cause file open and initialization errors when OnLine tries to access the disk. This problem only shows up when you shut the machine down and bring it back up.

You must use the raw character special devices found in /dev/rdsk. You will see device names such as c0t1d0s0, c0t1d0s2, c1t1d0s0. Raw character-special devices will be marked with a 'c' in the first position of the permissions. For example: crw-rw---- informix informix c0t1d0s2 indicates that c0t1d0s2 is a character-special device and has permissions of 660 and has an ownership of informix and group informix. This device is set up correctly for OnLine to access it. What the letters mean: c=controller, t=target, d=device, s=slice.

Controllers and slices are what we look at for the most part. Controllers are important because you want to spread your dbspaces out evenly over as many controllers as possible. Slices are important because it tells you what part of the disk you are working with. If you use slice 2 then you shouldn't use any other slices on that disk. The format utility will show you what the "map" and "label" are for a disk and how it is sliced up. A label is a predefined mapping for a disk layout. It defines how the slices are configured. Run "format", Choose "Disk, Partition, Print" to see information on a particular disk and partition.

The second important thing to remember is that the device name in /dev/rdsk is really a link to a device name. This becomes important when you are setting permissions. For example c0t1d0s0 is linked to ../../devices/io-unit@f->...etc. By doing a ls -al /dev/rdsk you will see what I mean by the ../../devices/io-unit@f designation. You need to set permissions on each "chunk" or device as follows:

chmod 660 device
chgrp informix device
chown informix device

You would think that you simply do a chmod 660 c0t1d0s0. This is not correct. You need to use the following procedure which assumes you are at the console:

1. login as root

2. run openwin to get a graphical display if it is not running already.

3. cd /dev/rdsk

4. ls -al to see all links and physical device names

5. find the right device and highlight the actual device name

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 88 Mar 22 1995 c0t3d0s0 ->

../../devices/iommu@f,e0000000/sbus@f,e0001000/espdma@f,400000/esp@f,800000/sd@3,0:a,raw

(i.e.: In the above example, you would highlight everything after the c0t3d0s0 -> designation: ../../devices/.........:a,raw

^ ^

|______ highlight _____|

6. Press the COPY key on the left hand side of the keyboard in the special function key section.

7. Set the permissions.

chmod 660 <press PASTE key><RETURN>
chgrp informix <press PASTE key><RETURN>
chown informix <press PASTE key><RETURN>
ls -al <press PASTE key><RETURN>
(the ls -al should reveal the modified permissions)
8. Setup your own links to insulate OnLine from any changes in device names in case a disk should be swapped out. Create your links in the informix directory or create a directory off of root like ifx_links in order to keep the path name short. DO NOT create your links in /dev. (Reason: In general, some systems rebuild /dev during boot up.) An example of a link might be the following:

ln -s /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s0 /ifx_links/ifx7_rootdbs.

Configuring through Veritas Volume Manager:

You will most likely find it in /opt/vxva. Type vxva to bring it up. If you are using this utility you cannot use the format utility. This utility can be very useful if you are using the Sparc Storage Array since it has many disks which you must manage. Devices can be found in /dev/vx/rdsk. You can create disk groups and place them in directories under /dev/vx/rdsk. The device name in the disk group will be a name which you create. You cannot use chmod, chown or chgrp to change the permission of these disk devices from the command line. You MUST change permissions through the volume manager. Bring up the volume manager and go into the section for 3230. It is in this section where you will have display to change user, group and permission. These should be set to informix, informix and 0660 respectively.

When using a volume manager, you do not need to worry about writing over the VTOC information at the start of the disk. You can begin your chunk offsets at 0.

Controlling TCP/IP Socket Time-out:

The /dev/tcp driver parameters may need to be modified in order to support timely closure of sockets when the client system has died. To do this, you need to use the ndd command to set the parameters on the device. By default Solaris has the tcp parameters which control the closing of the socket (when the other side dies) set to very high values. You need to set these to a more reasonable value such as 10 seconds to a minute. The ndd command should be executed (as root). For example, use the following commands to set the intervals to 10 seconds:

ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_keepalive_interval 10000
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_ip_abort_interval 10000
ndd -set /dev/tcp tcp_close_wait_interval 10000

This sets these three important parameters to 10 seconds. The last parameter will insure that the client process on the server will be signaled 10 seconds after the client machine dies.

6. HP HP-UX Systems

UNIX CONFIGURATION: SAM UTILITY

System Configuration:

Show Shared Memory Segments:

Use ipcs to show any existing shared memory segments.

HP-UX 9.04, 9.05, 10.0 and 10.01 (Modify Kernel):

Use SAM to modify the kernel. Reboot the machine after saving.

The following patches are required for HP-UX 10.00 and 10.01 due to potential data corruption in shared memory. The fix is incorporated in HP-UX 10.10.

700/10.00 - PHKL_6295
700/10.01 - PHKL_6297
800/10.00 - PHKL_6296
800/10.01 - PHKL_6298

Installing OnLine using CD-ROM under HP-UX 10.01:

If the CD-ROM is not mounted then follow this procedure:

1) ioscan -fnC disk
2) Look at the list generated and locate the device name for the CD-ROM.
3) Press the button on the CD-ROM drive to open it.
4) Insert the OnLine CD-ROM media
5) Close the CD-ROM tray.
6) mount /dev/dsk/c?t?d? /CDROM
It is assumed that /CDROM is an existing directory.
7) cd $INFORMIXDIR
8) ls -al /CDROM
You should see a file which starts with ONLINE...
9) tar xvf /CDROM/ONLINE* (Extract the files)
10) ./installonline
11) umount /CDROM (Unmount CDROM)
12) Press the button on the CD-ROM drive to open it.
13) Remove the OnLine CD-ROM media.
14) Repeat this procedure beginning at step #4 for additional products.

Installing OnLine 7.11 or lower with HP-UX 10.01:

HP-UX 10.01uses the POSIX shell. The Informix installonline script does not work with this shell. It is necessary to use the following procedure only for ./installonline:

1) /usr/old/bin/sh
2) ./installonline

Kernel Asynchronous I/O (KAIO):

HP-UX 10.0 supports Kernel AIO. For OnLine Version 7.10 and 7.11 KAIO must be turned off in order to bring the engine up. Before running oninit to bring the engine up remember to export KAIOOFF=1 if bourne or korn shell and setenv KAIOOFF 1 if you are using c-shell.

Configuring Disks and Setting Informix Permissions:

General disk discovery commands:

Mounted Space

The command 'bdf' can be used to determine what the space utilization is for mounted devices. An example follows:

FilesystemkbytesusedavailcapacityMount/dev/vg00/lvol1104299619323193766%//dev/vg00/
lvol5100219165900320%/tmp/dev/vg00/lvol41370603111467711886590%/users/dev/vg00/
lvol31886831047386507662%/usr/dev/vg01/lvol5104851202787408721%/usr/mail/dev/vg01/
lvol3 96947358905136241%/usr/local

Swap Space

To determine how much swap space is on the system run the command 'swapinfo -t'. This will display the devices that are set up as swap devices. For example. /dev/vg00/lvol2 and /dev/vg00/lvol6 are set up as swap devices.

What the letters mean:

If you look at the devices in /dev/rdsk, you will see device names like c0t1d0 and c1t3d0. The c=controller # so c0 is the first controller card, t=target SCSI ID for that controller card, d=disk so d0 is the entire disk.

Disk Information

The comman "ioscan -f" or "ioscan -fnC disk" provides information on SCSI addresses and device usage. You can use this to map a SCSI ID to a specific device.

The command diskinfo is used to discover the specific information about a device such as the vendor, product id, size and etc. You must execute diskinfo against a specific device. The main goal here is to find out what size the disk is. For example: diskinfo /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0

			Result:	SCSI describe of /dev/rdsk/c0t1d0

					vendor: 		HP

					product id:		C2490WD

					type: 		direct access

					size: 		2082636 Kbytes

					bytes per sector: 512

Direct access to disks in /dev/rdsk:

To prepare the device for OnLine to access use the following procedure:

1) login as root
2) cd /dev/rdsk
3) decide which disks you will be using
4) chmod 660 c?t?d?
5) chgrp informix c?t?d?
6) chown informix c?t?d?
7) Create your links in a directory such as /ifx_links.
8) cd /ifx_links
9) ln -s /dev/rdsk/c?t?d? ifx7_rootdbs
10) Change the name of the link for each new device you select.

Access to disks through HP Volume Manager:

A) Login as root

B) Create volume groups:

1. bdf Determine what volume groups exist
- or -
2. vgdisplay -v Determine what volume groups exist
3. mkdir vg## ## is the number you choose for the group
which does not currently exist.
4. mknod /dev/vg##/group c 64 0x040000 Make the node. 64=major#,
0x040000=minor#
5. pvcreate /dev/rdsk/c?t?d? Only done once to a disk to add to vol. group
6. vgcreate vg## /dev/dsk/c?t?d? Notice that we used /dev/dsk
vgcreate adds a disk to a vol. group
7. pvdisplay /dev/dsk/c?t?d?
Note: You can use vgextend to add a disk to a volume group.
8. vgdisplay -v | more Look for your new volume group
How to read the information:
VG Name: Volume Group Name
PE size (mbytes) The size of a physical extent in megabytes
Total PE: Total Physical Extents in volume
Alloc PE: Allocated Physical Extents in volume
LV Name: Logical Volume Name
Each PE or Physical Extent is of size PE Size. Total PE x PE Size = Size of disk in megabytes.

C) Create logical volumes:

1) Determine the size, number and name of your logical volumes. Default names will be lvol1, lvol2, lvol3...etc.
2) Use vgdisplay -v to determine Total PE and PE Size.
3) lvcreate -l <extent size> /dev/vg## {-n <volume name>}
- or -
4) lvcreate -L <megabytes> /dev/vg## {-n <volume name>}
5) repeat step 3 or 4 for the number of logical volumes you wish to create.
6) vgdisplay -v to display the results of your work.

Note: The -n is an optional parameter. If you do not include it, the default volume names lvol1, lvol2, lvol3...etc. are used.

For example let's assume we have a 2 Gig disk with a Total PE of 508 and a PE Size of 4 meg. Let's create 4 equal 500 meg volumes in volume group vg01. The total megabytes is calculated by 4 x 508 = 2032 megabytes.

		lvcreate -l 127 /dev/vg01	- Use extent size for size.

		-  or  -

		lvcreate -L 508 /dev/vg01	- Use megabytes for size.

		ls -al /dev/vg01		- List contents of vg01 directory

			Results:

				brw-r-----	root	sys	group

				brw-r-----	root	sys	lvol1

				brw-r-----	root	sys	lvol2

				brw-r-----	root	sys	lvol3

				brw-r-----	root	sys	lvol4

				crw-r-----	root	sys	rlvol1

				crw-r-----	root	sys	rlvol2

				crw-r-----	root	sys	rlvol3

				crw-r-----	root	sys	rlvol4

7) cd /dev/vg## (i.e. cd /dev/vg01)
8) chmod 660 rlvol? (i.e. chmod 660 rlvol1)
9) chgrp informixrlvol? (i.e. chgrp informix rlvol1)
10) chown informix rlvol? (i.e. chown informix rlvol1)
11) ls -al to check the results.
			Results using our example from above would be:

				brw-r-----	root	sys		group

				brw-r-----	root	sys		lvol1

				brw-r-----	root	sys		lvol2

				brw-r-----	root	sys		lvol3

				brw-r-----	root	sys		lvol4

				crw-rw----	informix informix	rlvol1

				crw-rw----	informix informix	rlvol2

				crw-rw----	informix informix	rlvol3

				crw-rw----	informix informix	rlvol4

12) Create your links in a directory such as /ifx_links.
13) cd /ifx_links
14) ln -s /dev/vg##/rlvol? ifx7_rootdbs (i.e. ln -s /dev/vg01/rlvol1 ifx7_rootdbs)
15) Change the name of the link for each new device you select.

7. IBM AIX Systems

UNIX CONFIGURATION: SMIT UTILITY

8. Intel NT-AS 3.5x Systems

Installing SE for NT 5.01.TE1

Requirements:

Your PC must be running Microsoft Windows NT 3.5 or 3.51.

You need at least 3.5 megabytes of available disk space in an NTFS filesystem.

  • Your login must have administrator privileges
  • Find your serial number and key before starting
  • Databases are created in the \db directory of the target installation directory.

Procedure:

1) Run setup.exe from your installation disk or directory.
2) Select the target path (Must be NTFS filesystem - i.e. C:\INFORMIX)
3) Tell setup where windows is located (i.e. C:\WINDOWS).
4) Choose the group (i.e. INFORMIX).
5) Determine if you want demo programs and error text files installed.
6) The files are installed and the group you specified is created.
7) Go to program manager and open up the Informix group.

For the purposes of this discussion, we will assume that the software was installed in C:\INFORMIX and the group is INFORMIX and windows NT is installed in C:\WINDOWS. Whenever you see those designations used, you should replace them with your actual target directory and group name.

8) Create INFX_GO.CMD Icon in INFORMIX group.
Create a new ICON (Click on File, New, Program Item -- OK)
Description: INFX_GO.CMD
Command Line: notepad C:\INFORMIX\bin\infx_go.cmd
Working Directory: C:\INFORMIX\bin
(Click on Change Icon, Choose the notepad default -- OK, OK)
NOTE: You should now have a new ICON in the INFORMIX group which allows you to view the infx_go.cmd file. You can repeat this procedure for the following additional .cmd files: dbaenv.cmd, and ifxenv.cmd.

9) Edit INFX_GO.CMD file.
Double click on the INFX_GO.CMD icon.
Go to the second to last line which reads @sqlexecd.
Replace this line with @sqlexeced.exe sqlexec
Save and exit.

10) Create HOSTS Icon in INFORMIX group.
Create a new ICON (Click on File, New, Program Item -- OK)
Description: HOSTS
Command Line: notepad C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
Working Directory: C:\WINDOWS
(Click on Change Icon, Choose the notepad default -- OK, OK)

11) Create SERVICES Icon in INFORMIX group
Create a new ICON (Click on File, New, Program Item -- OK)
Description: SERVICES
Command Line: notepad C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\services
Working Directory: C:\WINDOWS
(Click on Change Icon, Choose the notepad default -- OK, OK)

12) Edit the services file.
Double click on the SERVICES icon
Add the following unique service name and number:

sqlexec 2118/tcp # Informix-SE for NT 5.01
Save and exit.
NOTE: You should verify that on your system 2118/tcp is a unique value. If it is not then pick a service number that is unique. The service name sqlexec must be used to insure proper usage and operation.

13) Edit the hosts file.
Double click on the HOSTS icon.
Make sure that the IP Address of the NT machine and all clients who will accessing it are entered into the hosts file. The format of the hosts file is as follows:
101.102.103.100 my_nt_1
101.102.103.101 my_pc_1
101.102.103.102 my_pc_2

14) Modify Informix Icons working directories.
Click once on the INFORMIX-SE Utilities Icon to highlight it.
Click File, Properties. Make sure that the working directory points to the \db directory. (i.e. C:\INFORMIX\db).
Do this procedure for the DB-Access and INFORMIX-SE icons.
NOTE: The db directory is where you will create your databases. Databases will be created in a subdirectory with the database name as the directory name with a .dbs extension. You will find .dat (Data files) and .idx (Index files) in that subdirectory.

15) Create the stores5 demo database
Double click on the INFORMIX-SE Utilities icon.
cd db (Databases directory).
dbaccessdemo5 stores5
Press Control-C at the prompt so the .sql script files do not get copied into this directory. Read the DB-Access Manual to learn more about .sql files and there usage within the Query Language facility in DB-Access.

16) Install and Configure the sqlexecd connectivity service
The ability to run sqlexecd as an NT service is not documented in the Administrator's Guide. Here are instructions for installing and accessing this service:
1. From the Informix group in the Program Manager, select the SE utilities. This sets up the environment that will be used by the service.
2. Enter: instses
This adds the sqlexecd service to the Windows NT services.
3. Go to the Program Manager, select the Control Panel.
Then select the services icon.
Scroll down the list of services until sqlexecd is found, and select it.
Click on Startup.
Leave the type as Automatic
In the Log On As dialog box, press the ... button.
This displays the list of users.
Select the Administrator Account.
Press the Add button.
Press the OK button.
Select the password field, and enter the password for the Administrator.
Press tab and confirm the password.
Press the OK button.
Press the Close button.
4. When the system is rebooted, the service will be started.
*note: To remove the sqlexecd service, repeat step #1 and then enter: instses /r

17) Shutdown the NT machine.
When the system is back up, go to the control panel, Select the services icon and look to see if the sqlexecd service has been started. It should be started. Review the event viewer from the Administration Tools Icon if there were any problems.

18) Client PC configuration.
Edit the hosts file on your PC and add the IP Address and host name for the NT machine.
Edit the services file on your PC and add the exact service name and number as you entered on the NT machine. (i.e. sqlexec 2118/tcp).
Reboot your PC.

19) Test the Connection to SE for NT from your PC.
- You should be able to ping the NT machine (i.e. ping nt-hostname)
- Run setnet from the INFORMIX group.
- Set up the Hostname, User, Service: sqlexec, Protocol: tcp/ip, and Password.
- Go to More...
- Edit the DBPATH = C:\INFORMIX\db where db is the directory that contains the databases.
- Run ilogin.exe
- Press OK -- It will use the defaults from setnet and look for stores5 on the NT machine. If it works, you will see a list of customer names.

20) REVIEW RELEASE NOTES
Release notes can be found in the C:\INFORMIX\release directory.

21) Possible Errors.

Error -954: Client is not known to database server.

The machine on which your application is running is not known to the database server that you are trying to access. Contact your network administrator and ask that your machine be made known, most likely through the configuration file /etc/hosts on the other system. (This message appears beginning with Version 6.0.)

Resolution: Make sure NT knows where the hosts file is at and your client PC IP Address and name are in the hosts file on the NT machine and in the correct location: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts

Error -932: Error on network connection, function system call failed.

This message is usually follows by a windows prompt box which reads:

WINSOCK Error

getservbyname (WSANO_DATA)

OK

Resolution: Make sure that your PC has the correct services entry and location so that the TCP/IP software can locate it. Also make sure that the service name you entered through SETNET is a valid service and exists both on your PC and the host.

OR

WINSOCK Error

gethostbyname (SATRY_AGAIN)

OK

Resolution: Make sure that your PC has the correct hosts entry and location so that the TCP/IP software can locate it. Also make sure that the host name you entered through SETNET is a valid host and exists both on your PC and the host.

This is an internal error that reflects a failure in communication between your application and the network software (INFORMIX-STAR, INFORMIX-NET, INFORMIX-NET for Windows, and so on) at another site. Restart your application. Look for operating system messages that might give more information.

If you are using INFORMIX-NET for Windows, this could be a Windows Sockets problem; check your Windows Sockets 1.1 documentation for more information. Check the sqlerrm field of the sqlca structure for the particular Windows Sockets message.

If the problem recurs, ask your network administrator to run network diagnostics. If the error recurs, please note all circumstances and contact the Informix Technical Support Department.

Installing OnLine for NT 7.10.TD1

Requirements:

Your PC must be running Microsoft Windows NT 3.5 or 3.51.
You need at least 22 megabytes of available disk space in an NTFS filesystem.
  • Your login must have administrator privileges
  • Find your serial number and key before starting

Databases are created in the Root DBSpace which gets created during the configuration phase.

Procedure:

1) Run setup.exe from your installation disk or directory.

2) Enter the serial number and key

3) Enter your name, title, and company.

4) Enter your address information.

5) Select the target directory.

6) Enable/Disable Role Separation

7) Set up OnLine Administrative Groups

8) Set up an Auditing Administrator

9) Set up a Security Administrator

10) Copy Installation Files

11) Configure the Database Server
DBSERVERNAME: i.e. demo7_on_nt
12) Primary Root DBSpace Storage Location
Must be an NTFS directory structure
13) Select Tape Device

14) Enter informix user password

15) Specify SQLHOSTS Registry Machine
In most cases you will use the same machine where OnLine is installed.
16) Initialize OnLine. This will take a few minutes.

17) Add users to the global group ix_users in order to allow users to connect
to OnLine
18) Go to User Manager for Domains in the Administrative Tools Group
Find Informix-Admin in the group section.
Double Click on it.
Add the administrator to the Informix-Admin group.
19) Create new SETENV.CMD ICON
Create a new ICON item in the Informix-OnLine Dynamic Server group.
Create a new ICON (Click on File, New, Program Item -- OK)
Description: SETENV.CMD
Command Line: notepad C:\INFORMIX\setenv.cmd
Working Directory: C:\INFORMIX
(Click on Change Icon, Choose the notepad default -- OK, OK)
20) Create new ONCONFIG ICON
Create a new ICON item in the Informix-OnLine Dynamic Server group.
Create a new ICON (Click on File, New, Program Item -- OK)
Description: ONCONFIG
Command Line: notepad C:\INFORMIX\etc\onconfig
Working Directory: C:\INFORMIX\etc
(Click on Change Icon, Choose the notepad default -- OK, OK)

21) Create new ONLINE.LOG ICON
Create a new ICON item in the Informix-OnLine Dynamic Server group.
Create a new ICON (Click on File, New, Program Item -- OK)
Description: ONLINE.LOG
Command Line: notepad C:\INFORMIX\online.log
Working Directory: C:\INFORMIX
(Click on Change Icon, Choose the notepad default -- OK, OK)
22) Create new CONSOLE.LOG ICON
Create a new ICON item in the Informix-OnLine Dynamic Server group.
Create a new ICON (Click on File, New, Program Item -- OK)
Description: CONSOLE.LOG
Command Line: notepad C:\INFORMIX\console.log
Working Directory: C:\INFORMIX
(Click on Change Icon, Choose the notepad default -- OK, OK)
23) Test the Connection to OnLine for NT from your PC.
- You should be able to ping the NT machine (i.e. ping nt-hostname)
- Run setnet from the INFORMIX group.
- Set up the Hostname, User, Service: sqlexec, Protocol: tcp/ip, and Password. The default service set up by OnLine is turbo. OnLine adds an entry in the services file on NT automatically which is turbo 1526/tcp.
- Run ilogin.exe and enter stores7 in the database field
- Press OK -- It will use the other defaults from setnet and look for stores7 on the NT machine. If it works, you will see a list of customers.
24) Edit the SQLHOSTS registry to add additional DBSERVERNAMES for
doing distributed databases.
- Go to Administrative Tools group
- Double click on Windows NT Diagnostics Icon
- Select Registry Editor from the Tools Menu
- Go to the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE window
- Double click on SOFTWARE
- Double click on INFORMIX
- Double Click on SQLHOSTS (it should be highlighted)
- Select Edit Menu and Add Key
- Add the DBSERVERNAME of database server you want access to.
- Click on the new DBSERVERNAME to highlight it.
- Select Edit Menu and Add Value
Value Name: HOST
Data Type: REG_SZ
click OK
String: (Enter host name where DBSERVERNAME is resident)
click OK
- Select Edit Menu and Add Value
Value Name: OPTIONS
Data Type: REG_SZ
click OK
String: (Do not enter anything here)
click OK
- Select Edit Menu and Add Value
Value Name: PROTOCOL
Data Type: REG_SZ
click OK
String: olsoctcp
click OK
- Select Edit Menu and Add Value
Value Name: SERVICE
Data Type: REG_SZ
click OK
String: (Enter the service for DBSERVERNAME)
click OK
- Select File and Exit: You are finished editing SQLHOSTS

- Modification of network security files like hosts.equiv and .netrc may be required to allow secure access between two different servers. Those files will be found in the windows directory. For example you would most likely look in the C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc directory. The hosts.equiv would contain the name of other machines that are trusted by the NT server.

- DBPATH (optional) For OnLine:

Use DBPATH to identify the database servers that contain databases. It also is used by DB-ACCESS look for command scripts (.sql files). If DBPATH is pointing to database servers, the Database menu option in DB-ACCESS will give you a complete list of databases available on your own database server as well as all databases available on the database servers listed in your DBPATH. In our scenario from above, you would set DBPATH as follows if you want DB-ACCESS to recognize remote databases: DBPATH=//db2_soc://db3_soc; export DBPATH. The DBSERVERNAME is used in this example of DBPATH.

25) REVIEW RELEASE NOTES
Release notes can be found in the C:\INFORMIX\release directory.
26) Possible Errors.

Error -954: Client is not known to database server.

The machine on which your application is running is not known to the database server that you are trying to access. Contact your network administrator and ask that your machine be made known, most likely through the configuration file /etc/hosts on the other system. (This message appears beginning with Version 6.0.)

Resolution: Make sure NT knows where the hosts file is at and your client PC IP Address and name are in the hosts file on the NT machine and in the correct location: C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts

Error -932: Error on network connection, function system call failed.

This message is usually follows by a windows prompt box which reads:

WINSOCK Error

getservbyname (WSANO_DATA)

Resolution: Make sure that your PC has the correct services entry and location so that the TCP/IP software can locate it. Also make sure that the service name you entered through SETNET is a valid service and exists both on your PC and the host.

Error -932: Error on network connection, function system call failed.

This message is usually follows by a windows prompt box which reads:

WINSOCK Error

gethostbyname (SATRY_AGAIN)

Resolution: Make sure that your PC has the correct hosts entry and location so that the TCP/IP software can locate it. Also make sure that the host name you entered through SETNET is a valid host and exists both on your PC and the host.

This is an internal error that reflects a failure in communication between your application and the network software (INFORMIX-STAR, INFORMIX-NET, INFORMIX-NET for Windows, and so on) at another site. Restart your application. Look for operating system messages that might give more information.

If you are using INFORMIX-NET for Windows, this could be a Windows Sockets problem; check your Windows Sockets 1.1 documentation for more information. Check the sqlerrm field of the sqlca structure for the particular Windows Sockets message.

If the problem recurs, ask your network administrator to run network diagnostics. If the error recurs, please note all circumstances and contact the Informix Technical Support Department.

9. PC WINDOWS 3.1 Systems

1) Run setup.exe.
2) You will need the serial number and key.
3) You will need to know the installation directory
4) Setup may change autoexec.bat, system.ini, win.ini or other system files.
5) Rebooting the PC is generally required for any changes in the autoexec.bat to take place.
6) No other programs should be running during the installation.

Excerpted from INFORMIX INSTALLATION AND CONFIGURATION GUIDE, by Mike Tinius, Informix Software, Inc. This part consists of chapters 5 to 9 out of 9 chapters. Mike is a Systems Engineer with the Informix located in Bethesda, MD, and is the Commercial Division's representative to the Washington Area Informix User Group.


Informix Outperforms Microsoft on NT Operating System

Informix Announces Record TPC-C Benchmark for Windows NT 4.0 on Compaq ProLiant 5000

(Press Release - Informix Software Corporation)

MENLO PARK, Calif.-Oct. 23, 1996--Informix Software, Inc. (NASDAQ:IFMX), the leading provider of innovative database technology, today announced a record-breaking TPC-C benchmark result on Compaq Computer Corporation's Compaq ProLiant 5000 6/200 Model 2, running Microsoft's Windows NT Server 4.0.

INFORMIX-OnLine Workgroup Server delivered 6,842.70 tpmC running Compaq's four-way, midrange ProLiant 5000 server with a client/server implementation. This outstanding result surpassed the existing performance record in the industry, which was held by Microsoft SQL Server, and establishes Informix as the performance leader on the NT platform.

"This benchmark demonstrates the power of Informix's database technology, outperforming our competitors' products even on their native operating systems," said Mike Saranga, senior vice president of product management and development at Informix.

"By providing industry-leading, high-performance database technology backed by audited benchmarks, customers are assured of Informix's commitment to NT leadership and Informix's continued commitment to quality and performance, regardless of platform."

Informix and Compaq Collaborate On NT

Informix's record-breaking benchmark quantifies the combined power of INFORMIX-OnLine Workgroup Server, based on Informix's industry-leading Dynamic Scalable Architecture (DSA), and Compaq ProLiant 5000 Server with its Pentium Pro power. Informix worked closely with Compaq to optimize INFORMIX-OnLine Workgroup Server for NT in order to take full advantage of Compaq's Pentium Pro servers. These products together deliver record-breaking performance to customers using NT to deploy business-critical applications for decision support, on-line transaction processing (OLTP) and project collaboration using intranets.

About INFORMIX-OnLine Workgroup Server

INFORMIX-OnLine Workgroup Server is part of Informix's OnLine family of databases -- INFORMIX-OnLine Workstation, INFORMIX-OnLine Workgroup Server, INFORMIX-OnLine Dynamic Server and INFORMIX-OnLine Extended Parallel Server -- all of which are based on the company's industry-leading Dynamic Scalable Architecture (DSA). Informix provides the industry's only family of database servers with the same underlying architecture, allowing for complete scalability of applications from the desktop to the data center.

About Compaq Computer Corporation

Compaq Computer Corporation, a Fortune 500 company and the world's largest supplier of personal computers, delivers useful innovation through products that network people with information. Compaq is strategically organized to meet the current and future needs of its customers, offering Internet and enterprise computing solutions, networking products, commercial PC products and commercial PCs. Information about Compaq and its products can be found at Compaq Online or by calling 800/OK-COMPAQ.

About Informix

Informix Software, based in Menlo Park, California, provides innovative database technology that enables the world's leading corporations to manage and grow their businesses. Informix is widely recognized as the technology leader for corporate computing environments, ranging from workgroups to very large OLTP and data warehouse applications. Informix's database servers, application development tools, superior customer service, and strong partnerships enable the company to be at the forefront of many leading-edge information technology solution areas. More information about Informix is available via the World Wide Web at http://www.informix.com and http://www.illustra.com.


This Newsletter is published by the Washington Area Informix Users Group.

Lester Knutsen, President/Editor

Washington Area Informix Users Group

4216 Evergreen Lane, Suite 136, Annandale, VA 22003

Phone: 703-256-0267

lester@access.digex.net